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Scroll through the pages to find information on many topics of interest, resources and tools to help you on your journey through grief.

Welcome

Welcome to the Good Griever blog site! Here you will find information, resources and tools to help you through grief, whether you are brand new to grief or have been living with it for years. You may also be a professional wanting to learn more about grief to enhance the work that you already do. Come back and visit regularly. Leave your comments. Ask a question. Join the conversation. In grief, there is always something new to learn and share with others.

As a bereaved mom of a daughter who committed suicide in 2005 at the age of twenty-two, the idea for this blog was born from my continued desire to help other grievers. Having spent years on a quest to find answers and inner peace after the most devastating loss of my life, I remain passionate about sharing information and tools with other grievers to learn from them and help them on their own healing journey. Having friends alongside to share this often crazy path navigating the world of grief has been my greatest comfort and joy. I hope it will be for you too. You can read more about what I do at www.vonnesolis.com.

Years ago, when my daughter died, this type of public space wasn’t available. Only chat rooms were, where you had to become a member and sign in to post a comment in a closed forum. Not anymore. Today, we can freely participate online and spread the word instantaneously to  educate others about what grief is really like. Not only does this empower grievers about our needs and rights, but it also contributes to a much needed shift in cultural awareness that can lead to better support systems for the bereaved becoming available. Everyone is or one day will be a griever. We need to start talking more openly about loss (including difficult deaths) and grief.

In June 2018, I gave a presentation at the first ever conference for the bereaved in Ottawa, Canada. My topic was Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder in Grief. The room was packed. Along with the organizers and other presenters at the conference, it was clear to us all that people want and need information about grief. They just need to feel safe, respected and courageous enough to vocalize their needs.

As an Angel Healing Practitioner, sharing wisdom channeled by the angels to help people empower themselves through any challenge or circumstance that has knocked them to the ground has been my passion since 2006. As such, I will regularly share tips, resources and tools on a variety of topics related to grief to inform, inspire and empower each reader through the many struggles we face as grievers. As an author, I will provide updates on upcoming books and publication dates and any promotions that may be available and point you to other resources and teachers that may also be of help.

Feel free to post your comments and questions. Let’s get this conversation started.

Community

Greetings from Vancouver Island! My name is Vonne Solis. Having lived as a bereaved mom since 2005 as a result of the suicide of my twenty-two year old daughter, I’ve experienced first hand the ups and downs of the many facets of grief millions of people struggle with. For more about who I am click here.

I started the Good Griever community as an accompaniment to the work I do as an Angelic Healing Therapist and Author to start a conversation about changing the current cultural practices and behaviours that disenfranchise the grief experience. The fact that we don’t talk about grief in our society has ensured there remains a serious lack of support for grievers in all areas of community (I’ll have lots more to say about this in my posts).

Many people are at a loss when a death occurs. They have no idea how to prepare for the experience (I didn’t either). Being thrown into grief from sudden loss is like finding yourself tumbling down Alice in Wonderland’s rabbit hole. Everything is distorted. Nothing makes sense anymore. Having gone through a number of experiences in grief, including coping with secondary losses, relationship breakdowns, other family deaths, setbacks, being diagnosed with PTSD in 2014, going on work disability; I know a thing or two about grief and just how difficult it is to stand up for ourselves and have our needs met in every facet of the experience. On this blog, we’ll be talking about all this and more, including metaphysics, angels, spirituality, how to manifest the life you want as a griever (there are differences than before you became bereaved) and other topics of interest as they arise.

The Good Griever community is not for the feint of heart. It’s for those courageous souls who undaunted, and in the most authentic way, are choosing to face their toughest pain in order to claim the life that they want, one step at a time.

Grief in general is difficult. Complicated grief from tragic, sudden and unexplainable loss is a never-ending cycle of bits and pieces of the toughest lessons we will ever face as humans. Sometimes the grief feels like survival. Other times it can feel like a complicated mix of humility and gratitude for the experience that brought us our pain. Much of the time it feels unbearably, like the emptiness it is, because it’s just so hard to relinquish the sorrow caused by devastating loss.

The Good Griever community invites you to feel confident and safe enough to express yourself authentically in your grief, while at the same time, through the information, resources and tools provided on this site, commit to healing, growing and feeling inspired to continually want more for your life, as you feel ready. Whether it’s starting by finding that one small ray of hope to keep you going if you are brand new to grief and your world has been turned upside down, or you are well on your way to rebuilding your life and need some encouragement and support amidst the inevitable setbacks, this is the community for you. You’ll find a growing body of information to help you along your journey.

Living with sorrow and pain is not in anyone’s best interest. I know first-hand how conflicting it feels just thinking about surrendering suffering to once again feel joy after loss. Yet, we owe ourselves the right to be free from all pain and embrace the abundance that is ours to enjoy as the inherently loving and deserving individuals we are at our core. Suffering is not who we are. It’s an experience we are choosing to have, from which we can learn and grow through expanded consciousness.

Being able to feel joy and live a fulfilling life after loss has many rewards; not least, the emotional freedom that comes from releasing all struggle. This is when life flows with abundance. Good things constantly happen. Opportunities abound. Personally, I’d rather live this way than wasting the rest of my life suffering in sorrow and pain.

From the very beginning of my grief, I turned my life over to the angels. They helped me find the courage to speak openly about my daughter’s suicide and by talking about my grief, learn from my suffering. While the journey hasn’t been easy, it has been worth the effort to rise to the challenge of being the best that I can be before I leave this planet, seizing every opportunity the angels have brought me to continually manifest the life that I am ready for, every step of the way. My desire is that every other griever who is struggling and wants more for their life will join me on this path.

People often say they can’t imagine losing a child. That it is the worst possible loss. I agree. Yet, despite our different losses, together we can heal. The Good Griever community invites you to rise to your own challenges in suffering to be the best that you can be, at your own pace. Soak up whatever information you find on this site that feels supportive and comforting in your healing. Discard the rest. As they say, there’s no right or wrong way to grieve and no one grieves the same way, which is true. What is not often talked about is that grief is comprised of the same emotions, feelings and experiences that everyone suffers after loss: just to varying degrees, length of time, and  level of commitment and ability to heal, based on the relationship one had to the person who died.

Whatever the differences, please join the conversation. Your voice counts.

Blessings,

Vonne

Blog

PTSD: How it Impacts Relationships and What You Need to Manage Them

As a bereaved mom of a daughter who died by suicide in 2005, I have long been a proponent of change in how we view difficult loss and grief in our culture and the importance of understanding trauma and PTSD associated with certain types of loss. Not only for grievers, but everybody supporting them through …

The Parent Project – Is it Right to Produce a Grandchild from a Deceased Child?

I came across this article in a Canadian newspaper recently where a New York supreme court judge gave permission for the parents of a deceased son without his prior consent to use his sperm to produce a male heir. Cultural differences aside (they are from a culture where male heirs are important), they stated they …

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